Friday, 23rd September 2022

Table of contents

1   News Snapshot

●  

Stubble Burning and Associated Threats

●  

Women Issues: An Overview - Edukemy Current Affairs

●  

Millets: Nutritious Superfoods of Tomorrow

2   Terms & Concepts

●  

PM CARES - Edukemy Current Affairs

●  

Nano Plastic - Edukemy Current Affairs

●  

Yield Curve Control - Edukemy Current Affairs

●  

Loktak Lake: Northeast Marvel - Edukemy Current Affairs

3   Editorial of the day

●  

New Commission for SC Reservation: Old One Ignored?

●  

Supreme Court Elevates Capital Punishment Standards: IE

4   Case Study of the Day

●  

Buddha Pahad in Jharkhand: Free of Naxalism

.... Show less Show more
News Snapshot

Stubble Burning and Associated Threats


In News:

The Delhi government recently announced that it would spray Pusa bio-decomposer free of cost over 5,000 acres of paddy fields in the city. 

About the News:

Pusa Bio-Decomposer

  • It is a fungi-based liquid solution that can soften hard stubble to the extent that it can be easily mixed with soil in the field to act as compost.
  • The fungi thrive at 30-32 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature prevailing when paddy is harvested and wheat is sown.
  • It produces enzymes to digest cellulose, lignin and pectin in paddy straw.
  • It is developed by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and named after ICAR’s campus at Pusa in Delhi.
  • It rapidly converts crop residues, animal waste, dung and other waste into organic manure.
  • It is an inexpensive and effective technology for agricultural waste and crop residue management.

Benefits:

  • The decomposer improves the fertility and productivity of the soil as the stubble works as manure and compost for the crops and lesser fertiliser consumption is required in the future.
  • It is an efficient and effective, cheaper, doable and practical technique to stop stubble burning.
  • It is an eco-friendly and environmentally useful technology and will contribute to achieve Swachh Bharat Mission.
  • This measure is an attempt to prevent stubble burning and winter pollution in the NCR region.
  • A bio-decomposer capsule has been developed by the Indian Agricultural Research Institute which turns into a solution through a week-long process, after which it decomposes straw and stubble into manure.
  • Every year, when winter sets in, Delhi’s air pollution peaks with the air quality index (AQI) often plunging to the ‘severe’ and ‘hazardous’ categories impacting healthy individuals.
  • A major reason behind the spike in Delhi’s air pollution is stubble burning by farmers in Punjab and Haryana, which often increases to about 42% before the sowing season.
  • While stubble burning is an important factor, it is not the only factor that contributes to rising air pollution in Delhi which also includes factors including vehicles and industrial emissions etc.
  • Previously, the government has implemented predictions on air quality under the Graded Response Action Plan, prepared by the Commission for Air Quality Management.

Major highlights of the plan:

  • Background: The government first used the solution in 2020 -21 which has earlier shown positive results.
  • Action plan: The bio-decomposer solution is one of the 15 focus points in the government’s Winter Action Plan, which is in pipeline.
  • Dedicated teams: Environment ministry will set up of 21 teams to carry out the task of spreading the solution to over 5,000 acres in the city.
  • Costing: To control stubble burning and reduce air pollution during winter, the Delhi government will spray a bio-decomposer free of cost government in all the Basmati and non-Basmati paddy farms in Delhi.

The problem of stubble burning:

  • Wheat income: Every year, Punjab which gives around 35 lakh hectares under wheat coverage, produces around 20 million tonnes in the normal cropping season which is worth Rs 14,000 crores if the rate reaches Rs 1,000 per quintal.

  • Tudi dilemma: ‘Tudi’, which is made from wheat stubble, is considered to be the best dry fodder for cattle because of its nutritional value.
  • Stubble curse: Farmers actually don’t burn the stubble but the upper portion of the roots because after making fodder small few centimetres of the upper part of the roots are left and farmers even set that part on fire which can be avoided easily without any damage to the next crop.
  • Cost-effective: Farmers have to burn the roots in an attempt to clean the field for the next crop growing which is mainly paddy, and burning converts the leftover into ash and then they plough the field once which cost them Rs 1000 to Rs 1200 per acre which is economic as without burning more operations of field ploughing are required and every operation costs Rs 1,000 to Rs 1200 which is not affordable by majority farmers.
  • Impact: Burning leads to the killing of soil-friendly insects, and organic matter, and causes considerable loss of nitrogen, DAP, and Potassium besides generating a huge amount of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and black carbon, which all create environmental pollution.

Source:

  • https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/delhi-govt-to-spray-bio-decomposer-solution-over-paddy-fields-to-check-stubble-burning-winter-pollution/article65914708.ece

Image:

  • https://epaper.timesgroup.com/Olive/ODN/TimesOfIndia/shared/ShowArticle.aspx?doc=TOIDEL%2F2018%2F10%2F20&entity=Ar00201&sk=9486484F&mode=text

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: General studies III: Environment issues, Stubble burning
News Snapshot

Women Issues: An Overview - Edukemy Current Affairs


In news

The nature and scope of employment, political engagement, educational attainment, health status, representation in decision-making bodies, access to the property, etc. are some pertinent markers of a person's standing within the society. But not all members of the society, particularly women, have equal access to the elements that make up these status indicators.

Women Issues

Domestic Violence

  • According to the National Family Health Survey-5 report, domestic violence against women has decreased in India from 31.2% to 29.3%, yet nearly one-third of women there have experienced physical or sexual abuse.
  • Only 14% of all women who have been subjected to physical or sexual abuse have spoken out about it.

Lack of Timely Maternal Care

  • India's system of maternal care is in shambles.
  • Because of a lack of resources and inadequate infrastructure, pregnant women are unable to receive timely care, which raises the rate of maternal and infant mortality (quite latest data on MMR)

Culture of Pink Collarisation of Jobs

  • Most of the time, women are only considered suitable for "pink-collar positions," which are traditionally associated with women and include lecturers, babysitters, nurses, and receptionists.
  • They are denied opportunities in other sectors as a result.

Glass Ceilings

  • In India, preconceptions, media-related problems, and unofficial restrictions are some of the artificial hurdles that prohibit women from rising through the ranks of an organization to management-level positions.

Male Female Literacy rate Gap

  • Despite government efforts to ensure that men and women in our society have equal access to education, the literacy rate for women in India, particularly in rural regions, continues to be extremely low.
  • In rural India, where there is weak local law and order and schools are far apart, women find it unsafe to travel long distances for education.
  • Many households find it economically unviable to educate the girl child, which has led to traditional behaviours such as female infanticide, dowry, and early marriage contributing to the issue as well.

Home is the most unsafe place

  • According to United Nations research from 2018, the place where women felt the most unsafe was at home. A staggering 82% of all female murders take place in the homes of the victims' spouses and are murdered by an intimate partner or family member. The report makes special notice of dowry-related deaths and honour killings, where a woman's birthplace frequently turns into a deadly place for her.

Women still exist in the shadow of men (Considered “PLUS ONE”): Mythological times:

    • One such woman is Nur Jahan. Emperor Jehangir adored her for her intelligence and ability in addition to her beauty. According to many historians, Jehangir's reign would have been much shorter without her. In fact, he gave her the title "Padshah Begum," making her authority known to everyone in the Mughal court.
    • Lord Vishnu is the preserver of the universe. Goddess Lakshmi, his wife, is the enabler, the “plus one”. She is powerful. She represents wealth, prosperity, luck — all the things that enable a good life — yet Vishnu remains the centre.
  • Modern Era:
    • R P Goenka, who founded one of India's largest commercial giants in the 20th century, attributed his decision to purchase CEAT Tyres from the Italian tyre maker in 1958 to the encouragement of his wife Sushila.
    • L N Mittal of ArcelorMittal, ranked amongst the richest and most influential people in the world, publicly credits 100 per cent of his success to his wife, Usha.
  • Laws related to Women:
    1. Hindu Marriage Act and Special Marriage Act: It is applicable to Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs, Jains, and anyone else who does not practice the religions of Islam, Christianity, Judaism, or Parsis. Unless the Central Government specifies differently by notification in the official Gazette, it does not apply to members of any scheduled tribes. The act was last amended in 2005. It makes women eligible for succession as daughters.
    2. Global: Under California law, a wife is entitled to 50 per cent of all the wealth accrued by the husband after his marriage. We need to follow suit in India and maybe even make another amendment to our marriage acts securing the financial independence of women in marriage.
  • The recent highly public divorces of Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates show how the West is changing this, with wives getting sizable settlements.

Reasons Why Women Choose the Backseat?

  • Pressure arising from responsibilities
  • Upbringing and Societal expectations about the role they must play
  • Historical Belief System
  • Deep-rooted patriarchal mindset

Way Forward

Better Education Opportunities:

  • Educating women also entails educating the family as a whole. Women's self-confidence is significantly boosted by education.
  • Additionally, it permits individuals to alter their social status. Education gives people the ability and confidence to make better judgments.
  • For girls to have access to school and to be protected from discrimination in educational settings, the education policy needs to be more inclusive.

Collective Education:

  • Men: about the important role that a woman can play in their life.
  • Women: about the power they actually hold.

Prioritizing Safety of Women:

  • To secure the safety of women across the nation, a multi-sectoral approach should be developed to educate women about current government programs and mechanisms.
  • Panic Button, Nirbhaya Police Squad are some good steps in the direction of women’s safety.

Supporting Projects at the Local Level:

  • In order to increase inclusion in governance and enhance the position of women in India, projects at the lowest level of governance must be developed, supported, and promoted.
  • Nanhe Chinh (Panchkula, Haryana): Baby girls are brought to nearby AWCs by their families, who are encouraged to do so by Anganwadi Workers (AWWs).
    • Along with the names of the mother and the young girls, their footprints are drawn on a piece of chart paper and hung on the AWC wall.

Government Initiatives

  • Beti Bachao Beti Padhao Scheme
  • Ujjawala Yojna
  • Swadhar Greh
  • Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana
  • Pradhan Mantri Mahila Shakti Kendra Scheme
  • One Stop Centre

 Content Source Link:

  • https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/women-in-business-families-domestic-violence-education-8163535/lite/

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper I, Role of Women, social empowerment, Issues Related to Women
News Snapshot

Millets: Nutritious Superfoods of Tomorrow


In News

The United Nations General Assembly has declared the year 2023 as the International Year of Millet, on a proposal by India to create awareness about the health benefits of Millets.

About UNGA

  • The complete process of managing the procurement, storage, and delivery of resources to their intended place is referred to as logistics.
  • It requires to find prospective distributors and suppliers and assess their feasibility and accessibility.

About Millets

  • Kharif crop
  • Small-seeded grasses, including sorghum, pearl millet, ragi, small millet, foxtail millet, proso millet, barnyard millet, and Kodo millet, are commonly referred to as dryland cereals or Nutri-cereals.

  • Additionally, they are tougher and drought-resistant crops.
  • Millets require less water, fertilizer, and insecticides to flourish in poor soil conditions.
  • They are the ideal choice for "climate-smart cereals" due to their ability to withstand greater temperatures.
  • The earliest evidence of Millets was from Indus Civilization in around 3000BC.
  • Major Millets in India: Jowar (Sorghum), Bajra ( Pearl Millet), Ragi ( Finger Millet)
  • Indigenous Variety of “Small-millets” include Kutki, Chenna, Kodo and Sanwa.

Adequate Climatic Conditions:

  • Short Growing Season (Around 70-100 days, whereas paddy/wheat require around 120-150days)
  • Require less water (350-500mm as against 600-1200mm)
  • Drought-resistant crop can grow in poor soil conditions

Production

  • India, Nigeria and China are the largest producers of millets in the world, accounting for more than 55% of the total global production.
    • Indian alone accounts for 20% of global production.
  • However, in recent years production of millets has exponentially increased in Africa.

Benefits of Millets

  • They are cheap and more nutritious. For eg, Ragi has the highest calcium content and high iron content which can help in fighting anaemia.
  • Millets are gluten-free, have a low glycemic index, are rich in dietary fibre and antioxidants, and can aid with health issues like obesity, diabetes, and lifestyle issues.
  • It is well known that millets, which are Nutri-cereals, have a high nutrient content, including protein, essential fatty acids, dietary fibre, B-Vitamins, and minerals like calcium, iron, zinc, potassium, and magnesium.
  • It requires low investment for inputs.
  • In particular for children and women, it can offer nutritional stability and safeguard against nutritional deficiencies.
  • Additionally, it will be crucial for dryland climate change mitigation efforts as well as significant for smallholder and marginal farmers.
  • They have anti-ageing properties and acts as antioxidants.

Concerns/Challenges

  • Awareness regarding the nutritional value of millets is still low.
  • Lesser number of players working on value-added millet products in India.
  • Due to the presence of gluten in wheat, which makes the food softer is preferred.
  • Lack of Input subsidies and price incentives
  • Absence of proper market linkages
  • Changes in consumer preferences
  • Low on Demand

Government Initiatives

  • In 2018, Government declared millets as “Nutri-cereals” creating awareness about their “High-nutritive value” and “Anti-diabetic properties”.
  • 2018 was also declared as “National Year of Millets”.
  • Including millets in POSHAN ABHIYAN and Public Distribution System (PDS).
  • Initiating Millet Mission under National Food Security Mission (NFSM).
  • Millet Village Scheme started by Kerala

Global Initiatives

  • At the SCO meet, India proposed to organize the “Millet Food Festival”.

Way Forward

  • There is a need to encourage the production of more millet by offering financial assistance to farmers because these cereals provide benefits to the environment and society in addition to the social ones.
  • Millets deserve support given the effects of climate change and government efforts to promote climate-smart agriculture. It can also enable rainfed sustainable farming systems that are able to adapt to climate change and feed people from all socioeconomic backgrounds.

Content Source Link:

  • https://newsonair.com/2022/09/13/india-leading-the-world-towards-super-food-international-year-of-millets-2023/

Image Source Link:

  • https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.millesbury.com%2Ftypes-of-millets-and-their-benefits%2F&psig=AOvVaw2-4wUNRmRFAT_MSHbphpmp&ust=1663921870189000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CA0QjhxqFwoTCJCqmsWJqPoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 3, agriculture
Terms & Concepts

PM CARES - Edukemy Current Affairs


  • Context: Ratan Tata, KT Thomas, and Kariya Munda have been recently nominated as trustees of the PM CARES Fund.
  • ‘Prime Minister’s Citizen Assistance and Relief in Emergency Situations Fund (PM CARES Fund)’ is a public charitable trustthat has been registered under the Registration Act, 1908 in 2020.

  • The objectives of the Trust are:
    • To undertake and support relief or assistance relating to a public health emergency or any other kind of emergency, calamity or distress, either man-made or natural.
    • To render financial assistance, provide grants of payments of money or take such other steps as may be deemed necessary by the Board of Trustees to the affected population.
  • The Prime Minister is the ex-officio Chairman of the PM CARES Fund and the Ex –officio Trustees of the Fund are the Ministers of Defence, Home Affairs and Minister of Finance.
  • The Chairperson of the Board of Trustees (Prime Minister) shall have the power to nominate three trustees to the Board of Trustees from the field of research, health, science, social work, law, public administration and philanthropy.
  • The fund consists entirely of voluntary contributions from individuals/organizations and does not get any budgetary support.
  • Donations to PM CARES Fund would qualify for 100% exemption under the Income Tax Act, 1961 and are qualifies to be counted as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) expenditure under the Companies Act, 2013.
  • PM CARES for Children scheme was launched this year for children who have lost both their parents or legal guardian or adoptive parents, or surviving parents to the COVID-19 pandemic, during the period from March 2020 to February 2022.

Source:

  • https://www.livemint.com/news/india/govt-appoints-ratan-tata-2-others-as-trustees-of-pm-cares-fund/amp-11663746503305.html

Image source:

  • https://twitter.com/mygovindia/status/1244187541781327873

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 2, Governance, PM CARES Fund/ GS Paper 3, Disaster Management
Terms & Concepts

Nano Plastic - Edukemy Current Affairs


  • Context: A recent study has found that nano-plastics – plastic particles that are smaller than microplastics – can move up the food chain from plants to insects and from insects to fish.
  • Plastic particles below 5 mm in length are called microplastics whereas the smaller ones, with a size equal to or less than 100 nm (1/10 000 mm) are called nano plastics, which are invisible to the naked eye or even in an ordinary optical microscope.

  • It can lead to cell damage and inflammation in humans; growth impairments, larval deformities and other toxic effects in marine organisms.
  • Studies have indicated the potential for fragmentation of plastic materials into nanoparticles, i.e., “nano plastics,” and their accumulation in the environment.
  • Nanoparticles can show markedly different chemical and physical properties than their bulk material form.
  • Nano plastic particles are dangerous because they are easily ingested and can enter the organs and body fluids of organisms and thus propagate up the food chain.
  • Further, these particles are also co-contaminated with various chemicals and other pollutants.
  • Consequently, such plastic particles can interfere with various physiological processes, from neurotransmission to oxidative stress and immunity levels of freshwater and marine organisms.
  • Studies show that lettuce can take up nano-plastics from the soil and transfer them into the food chain, concluding that the presence of tiny plastic particles in soil could be associated with a potential health risk to herbivores and humans.

Source:

  • https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969720323093

Image source

  • https://thefishsite.com/articles/insect-larvae-transfer-nanoplastic-particles-to-fish-in-new-study

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 3, Environment and ecology, Marine Pollution, Plastic pollution
Terms & Concepts

Yield Curve Control - Edukemy Current Affairs


  • Context: The Japanese Yen has declined further as the Bank of Japan has stuck with its policy of yield curve control.
  • The yield control curve also referred to as interest rate caps aim to control interest rates along some portion of the yield curve.

  • It involves targeting a longer-term interest rate by a central bank and then buying or selling as many bonds as necessary to hit that rate target.
  • It is different from Quantitative Easing (QE) and short-term interest rate targets.
  • YCC focuses on bond prices and provides economic stimulus as short-term rates near zero.
  • It helps to prevent a recession or lessen its impact

Source:

  • https://www.cnbc.com/2022/09/20/bank-of-japan-monetary-fed-shrinking-yen-yield-curve-control-policy.html

Image source:

  • https://blog.stacksource.com/whats-trending-yield-curve-control-79cad710f75a

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 3, economy
Terms & Concepts

Loktak Lake: Northeast Marvel - Edukemy Current Affairs


  • Context: The Central Bureau of Communication is organizing a floating photo exhibition at Loktak Lake, Manipur.
  • It is the largest freshwater lake in the Northeast located in Manipur.
  • The attractions of this lake are the ‘phumdis’ or floating biomass.

 

    • Phumdis are a heterogeneous mass of vegetation, soil, and organic matterat various stages of decomposition floating over it.
  • The Keibul Lamjao National Park, theonly floating wildlife habitat on earth, is on the southwestern part of the lake and is the last natural habitat of the Sangai or brow-antlered dancing deer.
  • Other Species of Loktak Lake include Hog Deer, Otter, a host of waterfowl and migratory birds.
  • This ancient lake plays an important role in the economy of Manipur. It serves as a source of water for hydropower generation, irrigation and drinking water supply.
  • The lake is also a source of livelihood for the rural fishermen who live in the surrounding areas and on phumdis, also known as “phumshongs”.
  • Considering the ecological status and its biodiversity values, the lake was initially designated as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention in 1990.
  • It was also listed under the Montreux Record in 1993, "a record of Ramsar sites where changes in ecological character have occurred, are occurring or are likely to occur".

Source:

  • https://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2022/sep/23/manipur-floating-pics-exhibit-achievementsof-modi-governments-8-years-2501039.html

Image Source:

  • https://twitter.com/odmag/status/852786719682318337

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 3: Environment and Ecology: Loktak Lake, Ramsar convention, Montreaux Record
Editorial of the day

New Commission for SC Reservation: Old One Ignored?


Essence – The editorial discusses the issue of reservation for the religious and linguistic minority in light of the former Ranganath Misra Commission of 2007. It highlights the right to equality granted in our constitution to criticise the religious bias for reservation against non-Hindus. It also elaborated on how this issue of reservation got diluted due to politics. It highlighted how the terms of reference for the Ranganath Misra Commission were modified from time to time yet no action was taken in that regard.

In the end, it raises the suspicion that government may not take any action even after constituting the new commission as it has not taken any action earlier.

Why should you read this editorial?

  • To know about the reservation criteria followed in India.
  • To know about the details of the constitution (Scheduled Castes) Order of 1950

Source:

  • https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/reservation-for-muslim-christian-scs-new-commission-old-one-was-ignored-8162605/

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS2, Indian Polity
Editorial of the day

Supreme Court Elevates Capital Punishment Standards: IE


Essence – The editorial discusses about the Supreme court’s intention to frame a uniform procedure for awarding the death penalty. It highlights the imbibed bias in the current procedure which puts the convict in a disadvantaged situation. It also mentions the past judgements which tried to make this process fairer. It supports this step to strike balance between total abolition and active advocacy of the death sentence in light of a time when throughout the world the death penalty is being taken off the law book.

Towards the end, it highlights the persistent structural discrimination, while granting the death penalty, based on caste, religion and class at lower courts by citing the study from project 39A. it also brings to the fore the recommendation of the supreme court to take into account of mitigating circumstances while delivering the judgment.

Why should you read this editorial?

  • To know about various judgements regarding reforming the death penalty.
  • To know what should be the approach to refine the justice delivery system in India.

Source:

  • https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/editorials/life-and-death-capital-punishment-supreme-court-8162899/

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS2, Indian Polity
Case Study of the Day

Buddha Pahad in Jharkhand: Free of Naxalism


Background:

The Government forces have finally freed Buddha Pahad in Jharkhand, after almost three decades of the domination of the Naxals.

About the news

  • Buddha Pahad, Jharkhand, and Bihar which were Naxal-dominated areas have been freed from Naxals.
  • The Naxal or Maoist movement dates back to 1967 when armed peasants revolted in Naxalbari and later the CPI (Maoist) led the agitation, claiming legitimate socio-economic rights for tribal and locals.

  • Causes of LWE include:
    • Forest mismanagement, causes the traditional forest dwellers to fight for their aspirations against the government through violence.
    • Intraregional and Interregional differences.
    • Poor infrastructure growth and unemployment in rural areas lead to the disparity.
    • Poor implementation of Land Reforms, resulting in deprivation and exploitation.
  • According to Home Ministry:
    • The steadfast implementation of the National Policy and Action Plan to Address Left Wing Extremism (LWE)- 2015 has resulted in a consistent decline in LWE violence.
    • Also, the incidents of LWE violence have reduced by 77% from an all-time high of 2,258 in 2009 to 509 in 2021.
    • The geographical spread of the violence has also reduced as only 46 districts reported LWE-related violence in 2021, as compared to 96 districts in 2010.
  • Measures taken to reduce LWE include:
    • National Policy and Action Plan’ since 2015, envisages a multi-pronged strategy involving security and development-related measures.
    • The Centre provides funds for capacity building of the LWE-affected states under various programmes like the Security Related Expenditure (SRE) Scheme and Special Infrastructure Scheme (SIS) to fight the menace effectively.

Source:

  • 'Bihar Naxal-free, Area in Jharkhand Reclaimed after 30 Years': CRPF, Govt Announce Big Gains against Maoists

Image source:

  • https://twitter.com/vidursawhney/status/1495452414626856964/photo/1

 

Click the link below to attempt the daily MCQs and the Mains based questions.

Keywords: GS Paper 3: Linkages between Development and Spread of Extremism, Role of External State and Non-state Actors in creating challenges to Internal Security: Left Wing Extremism, Naxalism
Rating 0.0
Please rate the article below, your opinion matter to us
A notification message..

Share the article

Subscribe now

Get Latest Updates on Offers, Event dates, and free Mentorship sessions.

*you’ll be agreeing to our Terms & Conditions
Get in touch with our Expert Academic Counsellors

Get in touch with our Expert Academic Counsellors 👋

Preferred time to call

Frequently Asked Questions

UPSC Daily Current Affairs focuses on learning current events on a daily basis. An aspirant needs to study regular and updated information about current events, news, and relevant topics that are important for UPSC aspirants. It covers national and international affairs, government policies, socio-economic issues, science and technology advancements, and more.

UPSC Daily Current Affairs provides aspirants with a concise and comprehensive overview of the latest happenings and developments across various fields. It helps aspirants stay updated with current affairs and provides them with valuable insights and analysis, which are essential for answering questions in the UPSC examinations. It enhances their knowledge, analytical skills, and ability to connect current affairs with the UPSC syllabus.

UPSC Daily Current Affairs covers a wide range of topics, including politics, economics, science and technology, environment, social issues, governance, international relations, and more. It offers news summaries, in-depth analyses, editorials, opinion pieces, and relevant study materials. It also provides practice questions and quizzes to help aspirants test their understanding of current affairs.

Edukemy's UPSC Daily Current Affairs can be accessed through:

  • UPSC Daily Current Affairs can be accessed through Current Affairs tab at the top of the Main Page of Edukemy. 
  • Edukemy Mobile app: The Daily Current Affairs can also be access through Edukemy Mobile App. 
  • Social media: Follow Edukemy’s official social media accounts or pages that provide UPSC Daily Current Affairs updates, including Facebook, Twitter, or Telegram channels.

Have questions about a course or test series?

unread messages    ?   
Ask an Expert

Enquiry

Help us make sure you are you through an OTP:

Please enter correct Name

Please authenticate via OTP

Resend OTP
Please enter correct mobile number
Please enter OTP

Please enter correct Name
Resend OTP
Please enter correct mobile number

OTP has been sent.

Please enter OTP